July Pumpkins

A patch of new pumpkins for the 2013 haunting season.


Tale of the Big Blue Bunny

 

 

Mr. Bunny was a cheap little dollar store stuffed animal that was our oldest son’s  best friend growing up.

 

 

The little blue bunny was a tremendous source of comfort during doctor visits, thunderstorms and those days when it felt like the whole world was against you.

 

 

During the years Mr. Bunny lost an ear and had many “surgeries” leaving him pretty tattered and torn…but he remained Carter’s best buddy.

 

In honor of Carter’s High School Graduation we decided to build a large papier mache Mr. Bunny, complete with his array of odd stitching and single ear.

 

The Bunny was made from recycled cardboard that was assembled into a Mr. Bunny shape then covered with papier mache.

 

 

 

The project was a lot of fun and was greatly appreciated by our oldest son….everybody needs a Mr. Bunny in their life.

 

Zombie Gallery

Finished some new papier mache zombie which feature some pretty amazing textures considering they were created with everyday household materials such as paper towels, facial tissue and toilet paper.

“They’re coming to get you Barbara!”


Son Of Buster

My entry for the HauntForum $20 Prop Challenge is a companion piece to my 2010 entry titled “Buster Gravesley.”

 

 

Buster Gravesley had a son named Buster.  Buster’s son was a gnarly surfer dude head banging sort of guy, always on the look out for the perfect wave. Unfortunately Buster Jr. met his end in the jaws of a Great White Shark and joined his father in the afterlife where he still raises Hell every chance he gets and never misses an opportunity to break free from the confines of his rotting grave. Like father, like son …. Meet Son of Buster.

 

 

The Son of Buster Prop was built almost entirely from recycled materials and papier mache.

 

The prop features a mechanism which allows it to be manually operated. When operated the tombstone cracks in half revealing the Son of Buster creature lurking behind the tombstone.

http://youtu.be/q6mSnbw8ivM

 

 

This piece had to be created for under $20 dollars so the hardware choices were economical, if you plan on building this I would suggest using additional material resulting in a sturdier prop (such as larger hinges, etc.).

 

Son of Buster took approximately 30 hours to create over the course of a month. This was a fun build and there was a fair amount of experimentation and new techniques in regards to creating the head and the hands. The final prop stands about 3 ½ feet tall and is 2 feet wide.

 

Click here for the tutorial.

Embrace the Darkness

We decked out our back yard in a very scary fashion. Saturday, October 29th will be the only night to view our Halloween display. This year the props are in the back yard along with a roaring fire, s’more fixings and other assorted treats. Dress warm and help us celebrate our favorite holiday.

 

 

 

Please park across the street and use caution crossing the road as it is currently under construction. The display is scheduled to operate from 7pm until 10pm weather permitting. Please email me if you need our address or further information. 

 

 

 

 

Concept To Completion

There are two approaches I take when building a project. The first is working from preconceived designs such as sketches or photos and the second is creating freeform where I just wing it and let the project go where it needs to go.

 

Here are some examples of projects that were built from concept art. Some examples are well refined designs and some are very loose sketches representing the desired goal.

 

Gourdon Rotsworth

 

Buster Gravesly

 

Boris The Bolter

 

Charles McScardeylantern designed by Jasper Anderson

 

Pirate Skulls

 

 

Sir Rip D. Fleshkin designed by Breck Torres and Dustin Obermeyer

 

 

 

Arsenic Asylum

 

Character Tombstones

 

 

Witches

 


Sir Rip D. Fleshkin

This pumpkin was the most creative concept winner in the 2nd Annual Build Me A Pumpkin contest held on the STOLLOWEEN Facebook page.

 

Introducing Sir Rip D. Fleshkin designed by Breck Torres and Dustin Obermeyer. 

 

Fun concept to turn the stem into arms and hands, during the build I decided to remove one of the fingers because it seemed to work better.

 

Sir Rip also features removable eyeballs which can be displayed during the day and removed at night to allow the light to shine through the eye holes.